Key findings

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Read the nine key findings of the Report for Policy Makers

Policy recommendations

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Read the recommendations for policy arising from the Arctic Biodiversity Assessment

 

Download the policy report

Download the Report for Policy Makers

 


k1

 Arctic biodiversity is being degraded, but decisive action taken now can help sustain vast, relatively undisturbed ecosystems of tundra, mountains, fresh water and seas and the valuable services they provide.

k2

Climate change is by far the most serious threat to Arctic biodiversity and exacerbates all other threats.

 

k3

Many Arctic migratory species are threatened by overharvest and habitat alteration outside the Arctic, especially birds along the East Asian flyway.

k4

Disturbance and habitat degradation can diminish Arctic biodiversity and the opportunities for Arctic residents and visitors to enjoy the benefits of ecosystem services.

 
k5

Pollution from both long-range transport and local sources threatens the health of Arctic species and ecosystems.

k6

There are currently few invasive alien species in the Arctic, but more are expected with climate change and increased human activity.

k7

Overharvest was historically the primary human impact on many Arctic species, but sound management has successfully addressed this problem in most, but not all, cases.

k8

Current knowledge of many Arctic species, ecosystems and their stressors is fragmentary, making detection and assessment of trends and their implications difficult for many aspects of Arctic biodiversity.

 
k9

The challenges facing Arctic biodiversity are interconnected, requiring comprehensive solutions and international cooperation.

Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna

CAFF is the biodiversity working group of the Arctic Council and consists of National Representatives assigned by each of the eight Arctic Council Member States (Canada, Greenland/Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Russian Federation, United States), representatives of Indigenous Peoples' organizations that are Permanent Participants to the Council, and Arctic Council observer countries and organizations.

CAFF’s mandate is to address the conservation of Arctic biodiversity, and to communicate its findings to the governments and residents of the Arctic, helping to promote practices which ensure the sustainability of the Arctic’s living resources.

For more information visit the CAFF website.

Arctic Council

The Arctic Council is a high level intergovernmental forum to provide a means for promoting cooperation, coordination and interaction among the Arctic States, with the involvement of the Arctic Indigenous communities and other Arctic inhabitants on common Arctic issues, in particular issues of sustainable development and environmental protection in the Arctic.  Arctic Council Member States are Canada, Denmark (including Greenland and the Faroe Islands), Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russian Federation, Sweden, and the United States of America. In addition to the Member States, the Arctic Council has the category of Permanent Participants who include the Arctic Athabaskan Council (AAC), Aleut International Association (AIA), Gwich'in Council International (GGI), Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC), Russian Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North (RAIPON) and the Saami Council (SC). On May 15, 2013 Canada took over the Chairmanship of the Arctic Council from Sweden.

For more information visit the Arctic Council website.

 

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