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Here you can find suggested story ideas selected from the report.  The story outlines including an image and graph can be downloaded for press use. Any questions or comments can be directed to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or by calling Tom at +354 462 3350.

 


INVITATION TO SIDE EVENT AT bIODIVERSITY COP10 IN NAGOYA, JAPAN ON THURSDAY 28TH OCTOBER, 13:15 - 14:45 --- ROOM 234C --- BUILDING 2 --- 3RD FLOoR

A side event to present the Arctic Biodiversity trends report will be held on October 28th at the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) COP10 in Nagoya, Japan.  This will include a show and presentation on the key findings of the report and discussions with experts on the changes taking place in Arctic Biodiversity   Download event programme here

 

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Polar Bears
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Over the past several decades a number of studies have documented significant reductions in sea-ice cover in parts of the Arctic, thinning of multi-year ice and seasonal ice, and changes in the dates of break-up and freeze-up of sea ice.  Polar bears are distributed throughout the ice-covered waters of the circumpolar Arctic with an estimated population of 20,000– 25,000 animals. They are fundamentally dependent upon sea ice as a platform for hunting seals, travelling, finding mates, and breeding. Therefore, changes in sea-ice cover and in the patterns of freeze-up and breakup could significantly influence the population ecology of polar bears.  Download press package here

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Reindeer and caribou

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Wild reindeer and caribou are distributed in millions around the circumpolar Arctic where they play a key role in the environment, culture, and economy of the region.   They are fundamental to indigenous peoples, and have become part of their spiritual values, as well as their subsistence and commercial economies.  Being so abundant they support a diversity of predators, i.e. grizzly bears, wolves and wolverine.  Wild reindeer and caribou have declined by about 33% - from 3.8 to 5.6 million - since populations peaked in the 1990s and early 2000s following increases in the 1970s and 1980s.  Regionally, there is a tendency for herds to be synchronized in their phases of increase and decrease.  Download press package here
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Treeline

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Comparisons of historical and contemporary aerial photographs provide evidence that Arctic vegetation has already undergone significant shifts in recent decades, foreshadowing changes that are likely to come.  Increased shrub cover has been confirmed in two repeat photography studies in northern Alaska and in a recent study in the Mackenzie Delta region of Canada.  Download press package here

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Seabirds – murres (guillemots)
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Murres are among the most abundant seabirds in the Northern Hemisphere with a population in excess of ten million adults.  There are two species of murres (known as guillemots in Europe), the thick-billed murre and the common murre.  The thick-billed murre is mainly confined to Arctic waters while the common murre has a wider distribution.  Murres breed in very large colonies of up to one million birds on mainland cliffs or offshore islands.  Adults weigh up to 1 kg, can remain under water for up to 4 minutes, and dive regularly to depths of up to 150 m.  They can travel searching for food for up to 100km from their colony.    Download Press package here

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